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Variát “For The Heart Of Kyiv”

As a part of Post-Muzica series

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Variát in Post-Muzica series

Today as a part of Post-Muzica series there will be a premiere of audio-visual work from Variát “For The Heart Of Kyiv”

”Some fights are old, some have roots in ancient times, embedded in myths and legends, carrying the spirit from one generation to another. Our enemy would come with different names and different faces, but always with the same deathwish for us. Today they call themselves russians, before they were soviets, earlier they were muscovites. They want us to obey, or to die. They can’t exist without us, and they can’t accept our existence. They want us to become them, but for us, it is worse than death. Over and over again, century after century, generation after generation we rise from the ashes and carry on our fire of freedom and great love to life. And this fight today must be the last one. This monster, this last inhumane empire called russia must finally stop existing. We, Ukrainians, together with many other nations which suffered so much for such a long time, deserve to have a future where we breathe and develop freely. This fight, this great total war is not for territory or history, this war is for the spirit of freedom, for the light against darkness. And our victory will detonate countless other nations on their leap toward liberation, and this will change the world and start a new era. We don’t know when this war will end, but we know how. Glory to freedom, glory to life!”

(Dmytro Fedorenko)

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Premiere on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/549651176680384/

Premiere on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTbpzRPPbb4

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Radio On Berlin with Dmytro Fedorenko

Radio On’s friendship with Dmytro started in the winter of 2013-2014. In a weekly series of skype connections we listened to his reports from the Maidan uprising. Those events turned out to be decisive in the further development of Ukraine as an independent state. Russia didn’t agree with the new government. The war in Donbass, the annexation of Crimea were small steps towards the massive invasion we witness now.

Dmytro came to our studio to talk about all this, and give some insights from an Ukrainian point of view: the wars in Georgia and Chechnya were much more than images and words on TV and in the newspapers.

To not allow the curtain of darkness unfold over our souls we also talked about how the end of his label Kvitnu opened ways to new horizons. You will hear the name and history of Oles Berdnyk, Soviet and post-soviet moods, Startrek, Zelensky, family, friends, days with three hours of sleep and friends somewhere in Berlin talking about this while trying to keep a light heart.

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A new interview with Variát from the Chain D.L.K. zine

“… This project sees the imprint of a newly founded label Prostir and blends dissonances, corroded and corrosive sounds forged by hammered toms, drilled cymbals, metallic objects hit like percussion, and over-amplified combined with sparkles of synth-driven pierced modulations and even hooks to folk songs. Let’s give the word to its author.”

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VARIÁT is in Top100 albums of 2021!

http://www.indierockmag.com/article34782.html

“I Can See Everything From Here” is in 15th position of Top100 albums of 2021 by Indie Rock Mag version!

“On connaissait l’Ukrainien Dmytro Fedorenko pour l’électro-indus forcené et le glitch déstructuré de son projet Kotra, pour les expérimentations synthétiques en tous genres du label Kvitnu désactivé il y a peu, ou plus récemment pour les soundtracks techno post-apocalyptique et vaporeux du duo Cluster Lizard qu’il forme avec sa compagne et graphiste Zavoloka chez Prostir, successeur de Kvitnu, et dont le nouvel opus Star Corsair vient justement de sortir. Autant dire que la surprise fut conséquente en découvrant ce premier album de VARIÁT, ovni qui le voit tenir en plus des synthés des instruments tels que guitare, basse et batterie pour accoucher d’un inclassable titan instrumental aux saturations imposantes, à la croisée d’un metal expérimental présentant quelques atomes crochus avec le doom liquéfié des sorties récentes de Nadja, et d’une ambient dystopique et noisy, presque harsh par moments, qui semble s’élever des ruines de la musique industrielle pour inventer son propre langage cinématographique, celui d’une menace mythologique en apparence décrépie mais bien résolue à en découdre dans un dernier élan d’énergie noire et viciée.”

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Yellow Green Red reaction to Variát

Perfect for the autumnal season, here comes the Ukrainian artist Dmytro Fedorenko and his Variát project. It’s kinda like dungeon-synth without the synth, if that makes sense? In place of any obvious keyboards comes bass guitar in an extremely heavyweight form, often bristling at the edges with digital distortion and speakers vibrating beyond their capacity. They’re not riffs so much as sustained brutal notes, somewhat in the school of Swans, though I’m also reminded of Leda’s avant heavy metal repetition and the rich depths of sonic sludge that Black Mayonnaise liked to trawl through. I think there’s also some sort of occult vibe happening with I Can See Everything From Here – that sure is one scary eyeball on the cover – but I’m generally kind of oblivious to the mystical dark arts or black magic or whatever. In a horror movie, I’d probably be the first one to go, that random non-believer who disappears before things barely get started. When it comes the deep ominous drift and poisonous klang of Variát, however, I’m happy to stay put for the full duration.

https://www.yellowgreenred.com/

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Indie Rock Mag reviewed Variát

On connaissait l’Ukrainien Dmytro Fedorenko pour l’électro-indus forcené et le glitch déstructuré de son projet Kotra, pour les expérimentations synthétiques en tous genres du label Kvitnu désactivé il y a peu, ou plus récemment pour les soundtracks techno post-apocalyptique et vaporeux du duo Cluster Lizard qu’il forme avec sa compagne et graphiste Zavoloka chez Prostir, successeur de Kvitnu, et dont le nouvel opus Star Corsair vient justement de sortir. Autant dire que la surprise fut conséquente en découvrant ce premier album de VARIÁT, ovni du mois qui le voit tenir en plus des synthés des instruments tels que guitare, basse et batterie pour accoucher d’un inclassable titan instrumental aux saturations imposantes, à la croisée d’un metal expérimental présentant quelques atomes crochus avec le doom liquéfié des sorties récentes de Nadja, et d’une ambient dystopique et noisy, presque harsh par moments, qui semble s’élever des ruines de la musique industrielle pour inventer son propre langage cinématographique, celui d’une menace mythologique en apparence décrépie mais bien résolue à en découdre dans un dernier élan d’énergie noire et viciée.

http://www.indierockmag.com/article34644.html

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A short review on VARIÁT from the Silence And Sound:


“VARIÁT builds industrial architectures ready to collapse in the gaping holes opened by metal monsters playing post-metal fueled by gothic folk and cabalistic experimentation. An intense and dark album.”

https://silenceandsound.me/2021/10/26/variat/

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15 Questions to Dmytro Fedorenko

Fifteen Questions just published an interview with Dmytro Fedorenko (Kotra / Variát) on the topic of Sound.

https://15questions.net/interview/dmytro-fedorenko-talks-sound/page-1/

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Great review on Variát from Vital Weekly

You may not have heard of Variát before, but it is the newest musical project from Dmytro Fedorenko, who worked earlier as Kotra. He recently stopped his Kvitnu label and now only concentrates on making music. There is indeed a bit of change here. As for instruments, he currently lists guitar, bass, synthesizer and drums, whereas, in the old days, I would think it was all electronics (digital and/or analogue) and drum machines. What remained was his approach to sonic overload. Many of the releases by Kvitnu were indebted to the legacy of Pan Sonic. That is brutal beats and ditto synthesizers. That brutality is also present here, but now he’s using instruments. Maybe Variát plays these live, and perhaps these are sampled; most likely, I would say it is a combination of both. Take, for instance, ‘There’s Lot Of Light Leaking All Over’, in which loops of guitar noise and drums (and bass, no doubt) battle against a solitary non-looped organ. The information recalls the use of “blown amps, toms played with a hammer, and drilled cymbals”, all of which I can easily see within the context of this record. One of the things this record is not is a dance record. To be fairer, I would call this is a rock record. A noise rock record, to be precise. I like this a lot. The fact that Fedorenko makes a radical break with his past music, and yet, for all the brutal approach, at the same time, he stays completely in line with his past. I find that quite an achievement. The wall of noise rock approach with real instruments, treated with electronic devices, sampled and giving them more strength via sound effects, makes these eight pieces strong music statements. Music that needs to be played loud or not at all. There is simply nothing in between. There is no escape, and total surrender is required, but something beautiful will be yours. (FdW)

http://vitalweekly.net/1303.html